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The Cailleach
 
Ancient Woman of Wisdom

The ancient figure of the Cailleach, the Wise Woman or Crone, represents the wisdom that comes with age, and also is the dark or winter side of the Mother figure. She is surrounded by the bare trees of winter, bereft of leaves. Her cauldron is the cauldron of regeneration, for it is only by passing through the dark womb of winter that spring can be reborn. 8" tall, sculpted in Art Plaster and hand painted and clear-sealed by artist. May be used either free-standing or as wall hanging.

Blathine
 
Maiden of Spring and Flowers

A beautiful, but ultimately perilous, Celtic goddess, the Irish Persephone, she is the youthful goddess of spring and new growth, who divides her love between two suitors representing summer and winter. Daughter of Midir, a god of the Irish underworld, she was wooed by the Irish heroes Cu Chulainn and Cu Roi mac Daire, who battled one another for her hand. Ultimately Cu Roi triumphed, but his victory was to be short-lived, for she betrayed him for Cu Chulainn. Among the Welsh, she is Blodeuwedd 'Flower-Face', who similarly betrayed her husband Lleu Llaw Gyffes. Like the bright blooms she represents, her love is glorious, but fleeting. 8" tall, sculpted in Art Plaster and hand painted and clear-sealed by artist. May be used either free-standing or as wall hanging.
Brigit   
Bright Goddess of the Gaels

A Celtic goddess associated with the hearth and fire in all of its many aspects, in Ireland
Brigit was called upon by midwives and physicians, craftsmen and poets alike, as patroness of all creative endeavors and activities. Associated with the serpent as a symbol of fire and fertility, she is said to have been born at dawn on the threshold of her mother’s house, neither within nor without, to possess a magical cow that gave unlimited milk, to hang her cloak on the rays of the sun to dry, and to live in a house that appeared from a distance to be all aflame. Her most recognizable symbol, the cros brigde, or Brigit’s Cross, is a solar symbol, which also symbolizes the turning of the seasons. In Ireland her festival is Imbolg, on February 1, celebrating the time of returning warmth and fertility to the land after the long barrenness of winter. 8" tall, sculpted in Art Plaster and hand painted and clear-sealed by artist. May be used either free-standing or as wall hanging.
                    

The Morrigan
 
Great Warrior Queen

In Irish Celtic myth The Morrigan is the powerful goddess of war and sexual power, the guardian and patroness of warrior men and women. Also called Badb (pronounced bov), ‘Crow,’ together with her two sisters Macha and Nemain she formed a powerful trinity, as guardians and patronesses of warriors. Her name means ‘Great Queen’ or ‘Queen of Phantoms.’ Among the Celtic Gauls she was Cathubodua, meaning ‘Crow of Battle.’ Her animal form was the raven or crow. She and her sisters frequently appeared on the battlefield in the form of enormous black crows, lending strength to warriors or harrying their opponents, giving or depriving warriors of their courage in battle according to their whims, and carrying the souls of those fallen in battle to the Otherworld. 8" tall, sculpted in Art Plaster and hand painted and clear-sealed by artist. May be used either free standing or as wall hanging.below for more

Anu
       
Celtic Mother Goddess

The Irish Celtic Mother Goddess went by a number of names, among them Danu, the mother of the Tuatha De Danann ('Tribes of the Goddess Danu'), the Irish gods, and Anu, whose name means 'Abundance.' She is the embodiment of the fertile earth and the crops which sustain her children. 8" tall, sculpted in Art Plaster and hand painted and clear-sealed by artist. May be used either free-standing or as wall hanging. 

Flidais
   
Protectress of the Forest

An Irish Celtic forest goddess, protectress of wild places and the animals that dwell therein, Flidais in the ancient tales is portrayed as riding in a chariot drawn by wild stags. As goddess of animals and the hunt she is sometimes compared to the Roman Diana and the Greek Artemis. She stands between a deer and a wolf as keeper of the balance between life and death, predator and prey. Said to possess a fabulous cow whose milk could sustain hundreds, Flidais is also a goddess of female potency. In Irish tales it is said that the great warrior and hero Fergus mac Roich required the affections of seven women to sate his enormous appetites, or Flidais herself alone. 8" tall, sculpted in Art Plaster and hand painted and clear-sealed by artist. May be used either free-standing or as wall hanging.

Epona

Lady of Sovereignty and Horses

Epona, the Celtic goddess of horses, known among the Irish Celts as Macha, was the goddess of fertility and the land, to whom symbolic marriage conferred on Irish kings the right to rulership. She frequently took the form of a white mare, whose favor was essential for the land’s fertility, allowing a tribe to thrive and bringing prosperity to her people. Her Gaulish name, Epona, means ‘Great or Divine Mare.’ Among the Welsh she was called Rhiannon,‘Great or Divine Queen,’ for her power to confer sovereignty, and among the Romans, who also honored her due to the high number of Celtic cavalry soldiers among them, she was called Regina ‘Queen.’ 8" tall, sculpted in Art Plaster and hand painted and clear-sealed by artist. May be used either free-standing or as wall hanging.

Boann
 

Celtic River Mother 

Boann, whose name means ‘White Cow,’ was the goddess of the river Boyne in Ireland, which was named for her. Wife of the river god Nechtan, keeper of the sacred well of Connla, in which swam the salmon of wisdom, after her clandestine affair with the Irish father-god, The Dagda, Boann went to her husband’s well and circled it three times counter-clockwise, causing it to overflow and form the river Boyne, releasing the sacred salmon of wisdom into the world. As a river goddess, Boann is possibly identical with Danu, the mother of the Irish gods, who may have given her name to the river Danube in the original European Celtic homeland. In Celtic Gaul several rivers were given the name Matrona, ‘Great Mother.’ 8" tall, sculpted in Art Plaster and hand painted and clear-sealed by artist. May be used either free-standing or as wall hanging.